Cadets take to the streets in honour of inspirational Ranger

Pictured celebrating their arrival at Carrickfergus Castle are, from left, Staff Sergeant William Colgan; Sergeant Joanne McMaster; Cadet Staff Sergeant Grant Colgan; Cadet Shannon Colgan; Cadet Sergeant George Wray; Cadet Lance Corporal Corey Gorman; Cadet John Burns; Cadet Jordan Nielly; Cadet Ryan Jenkins; Cadet Nathan Swain; Cadet Kyle Cairns and Lieutenant John Read. INNT35-508CON
Pictured celebrating their arrival at Carrickfergus Castle are, from left, Staff Sergeant William Colgan; Sergeant Joanne McMaster; Cadet Staff Sergeant Grant Colgan; Cadet Shannon Colgan; Cadet Sergeant George Wray; Cadet Lance Corporal Corey Gorman; Cadet John Burns; Cadet Jordan Nielly; Cadet Ryan Jenkins; Cadet Nathan Swain; Cadet Kyle Cairns and Lieutenant John Read. INNT35-508CON

The story of a Northern Irish soldier who lost his legs and was blinded in Afghanistan has proved an inspiration to local teenagers, who took to the streets for a charity bed-push.

Three years ago Royal Irish Ranger Andy Allen was seriously injured by a makeshift bomb detonated remotely by the Taliban. His slow, painful road to recovery was memorably charted in a television documentary in which Andy shared his harrowing experiences with millions of viewers.

Last month, Andy encouraged Cadets from the Glengormley Detachment of the Army Cadet Force, together with their Adult Instructors, to put some fun into fundraising for St Dunstan’s, the charity which provides training and rehabilitation to blind ex-servicemen and women.

On August 6, ten Cadets, accompanied by three Adult Instructors, stepped out on a 13 mile sponsored bed push between Earlview Primary School in New Mossley and Carrick Castle.

“Anyone with a teenager in the family will know that it takes something special to get them moving first thing on a Saturday,” said Lieutenant John Read from Glengormley Army Cadet Force.

“It’s perhaps ironic that we got them out of bed to push a bed, but it was all for a very good cause.”