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20 year wait for footpath is over

Jordanstown residents have campaigned for a new footpath between Lynda Avenue and the railway halt in order to reduce the number of times they have to cross the road on the way to school.

Jordanstown residents have campaigned for a new footpath between Lynda Avenue and the railway halt in order to reduce the number of times they have to cross the road on the way to school.

A 20 YEAR campaign to have a footpath built on the Jordanstown Road looks set to end next week.

Work is scheduled to begin on Monday (February 4) to provide a footpath on the Jordanstown Road between Lynda Avenue and the railway halt.

The £60,000 project will include footway provision, drainage and utility alterations.

Jordanstown residents has been campaigning for the past 20 years for the footpath to be installed.

Temporary traffic lights will be in place from 9.30am to 4.30pm each day until the expected completion of the work in April.

Roads Service has carefully programmed the works operations and traffic management arrangements in order to minimise any inconvenience to the public, however, motorists should be aware that some delays may be expected and that additional time should be allowed when planning any journeys.

Margaret McCreedy, whose children attend nearby Whiteabbey Primary, organised a walking bus in June 2011 to highlight the safety issues in the area.

Hundreds of school children walked to the nearby primary school to highlight the dangers of them having to cross the busy Jordanstown Road twice because of the missing footpath on one side of the road.

Margaret said she was delighted with the announcement work was to begin on Monday.

She said: “Obviously there will be delays on the road while the work is carried out, especially during the times of afternoon school runs, but we hope that these will be justified by the overall safety benefits for the whole community.

“Clearly the most obvious winners are the large numbers of school children who can now make their way to Whiteabbey Primary School without having to cross the busy Jordanstown Road twice, not to mention those who can now reach the patrol crossing man without having to cross the main road unaided.”

She went on: “Huge thanks are due to all the pupils, parents and supporters of Whiteabbey Primary School who took part in our Big Morning Out, a corporate walk to school, in June 2011.

“Thanks also to Peter Wright, principal at Whiteabbey, and his staff who wholeheartedly facilitated the campaign. The coverage that the campaign received from the Newtownabbey Times, BBC Newsline and Radio Ulster and from elected representatives, was invaluable. But final thanks must go to the Roads Service for putting us into its scheme of works to allow this to happen.

“Individuals first started campaigning for this short stretch of footpath nineteen years and I am enormously thrilled to have been involved in such an endeavour.”

Announcing the scheme, Regional Development Minister Danny Kennedy said: “The scheme will enable pedestrians, including school children to walk safely on the south side of the Jordanstown Road from Lynda Avenue to the Railway Halt and on towards Circular Road without having to cross this busy road twice.”

 
 
 

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