Army cadets organise clean-up at Knockagh war memorial site

Army cadets from Glengormley take part in the clean-up day at Knockagh monument. INNT 44-612-CON
Army cadets from Glengormley take part in the clean-up day at Knockagh monument. INNT 44-612-CON
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Army cadets and instructors from Glengormley organised and took part in a clean-up at Knockagh monument, Co Antrim’s official war memorial.

The cadets, from Glengormley Detachment, C Company, organised the event as part of the current series of events taking place over the Decade of Centenaries, in which the 1st Northern Ireland Battalion is playing a key part.

The enthusiastic group carried out a litter lift in the memorial car park and along the access road to the monument near Greenisland.

Cadet CSM Corey Gorman commented: “This is the first time I have seen the memorial up close and it is a lot larger than I thought it would be.

“It was really good for us cadets to play a part in helping to clean the area around the memorial. We also learned about its history and what it means to us today.”

C Company second in command and Detachment Commander of Glengormley Detachment, Captain John Read, said: “War memorials are an important feature of the local and wider landscape, and caring for them, and the whole communities which surround them, is integral to installing pride in a local area so we must ensure that they receive the respect they deserve again.

“Our thanks go to Carrickfergus Borough Council for assistance with equipment and permission to undertake the clean-up.

“Thanks also to Whiteabbey Royal British Legion for taking action over the years to conserve and care for the Co Antrim war memorial at Knockagh which is a fitting tribute to those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom today.”

The Knockagh monument is the largest war memorial in Northern Ireland and takes the form of an obelisk, a replica of the Wellington Monument in Phoenix Park, Dublin, except that it is exactly half the height at 110 feet (33.5m) high and the base is 25 feet (8m) square.

The foundation stone of the Knockagh monument was laid in 1922.