Ballyclare High girls go for Big Bang glory

Ballyclare High School students Amy Campbell, Esther McNeill, Aimee Russell and Lisa Patterson who have won a place in the finals of the UK's prestigious National Science + Engineering Competition 2013. INLT 38-614-CON
Ballyclare High School students Amy Campbell, Esther McNeill, Aimee Russell and Lisa Patterson who have won a place in the finals of the UK's prestigious National Science + Engineering Competition 2013. INLT 38-614-CON

Four talented pupils from Ballyclare High School are one step closer to science victory after winning a place in the finals of the UK’s prestigious National Science + Engineering Competition 2013.

Lisa Patterson and Aimee Russell excelled in the regional heats of the competition with a project that will investigate how music can be played through a foil magnetic field.

And Esther McNeill and Amy Campbell wowed judges with a project that looks into the effects of implants on the body.

They will now go head-to-head with students from across the country in an attempt to claim one of the UK’s most sought-after science and engineering honours for young people.

The girls will represent Ballyclare as a region of rising young talent at the finals of the National Science + Engineering Competition held at The Big Bang Fair at London ExCeL in March 2013 – the UK’s largest celebration of science and engineering for young people.

Their shortlisted entries will be showcased to over 60,000 visitors and they will come face-to-face with top celebrity judges in a Dragons’ Den-style pitch process.

Esther said: “The National Science + Engineering Competition has been a great experience so far and I can’t wait to go to The Big Bang Fair in London next March. This competition has opened to many doors and led me to discover that science is the future and I want to be part of that future.”

The search is still on for more young thinkers, inventors and innovators to put forward their big ideas for the chance to compete for top prizes and international experiences worth over £50,000.

Open to 11-18 year olds, the deadline for entries is October 31, so there’s plenty of time for youngsters to come up with that novel idea, invention, concept or solution that could see them crowned ‘UK Young Engineer of the Year’ or ‘UK Young Scientist of the Year’.

Entries can be uploaded online at www.thebigbangfair.co.uk/nsec through a written submission or by producing a short film.

Sir Roland Jackson, chief executive of the British Science Association which runs the National Science + Engineering Competition, said: ”We’re thrilled that they have got through as regional finalists and wish them all the best for the national finals at The Big Bang Fair in London. The projects really caught our imagination and we hope that they will inspire other young people to enter the competition.

“Now in its fifth year, our contest has become renowned for recognising, rewarding and inspiring thousands of talented youngsters in all areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

“We need to nurture a new generation of bright sparks, and the competition offers a great incentive to get youngsters experimenting and having fun with science and engineering.”

Visit www.thebigbangfair.co.uk/nsec for more information about this year’s competition.