Glengormley teenager conquers Belfast Castle

Good head for heights: Rachel Kerr taking part in the abseil challenge for the Meningitis Research Foundation at Belfast Castle. INNT 43-830CON
Good head for heights: Rachel Kerr taking part in the abseil challenge for the Meningitis Research Foundation at Belfast Castle. INNT 43-830CON

A brave Glengormley teenager recently took on a nerve-racking challenge to help raise much needed funds for a very worthy cause.

Rachel Kerr was part of a fundraising team who abseiled down the side of Belfast Castle for charity.

The team of volunteers were raising funds for the Meningitis Research Foundation. And to date they have collected over £2,000 for the charitable cause.

The abseilers stood at the highest point of the castle, where they were able to enjoy amazing views across Belfast Lough. They then descended 100ft to meet family and friends who were gathered in the gardens below.

Rachel explained that she was pleased to help raise funds for the charity.

“I was thrilled to be able to take part in the abseil as it is always something I have wanted to do. Also, being able to support such a great cause as Meningitis Research Foundation through my fundraising made the experience even more special.

“I’m so pleased to have exceeded my target and raised over £360 in support of the charity’s work,” she said.

Meningitis Research Foundation fundraising officer, Karen Dunlop thanked Rachel for taking part in the fundraising challenge.

“It was a really great challenge, in a stunning setting and I’d like to thank Rachel for taking part and raising a fantastic amount of sponsorship in aid of our work.

“It was great to see everyone conquer the castle and even enjoy the experience. Thanks to this fantastic fundraising from Rachel and our other team members, we’ve raised over £2,000 to date which will help us to fund our cutting edge research, raise awareness of the disease across the province and support those who have been affected,” she explained.

Meningitis and septicaemia are very serious conditions which affect around 3,400 people in the United Kingdom and Ireland each year. They can be easily mistaken for milder illnesses such as flu, but can kill within hours. Sadly, one in 10 cases are fatal. One third of survivors are left with life-changing after-effects such as multiple amputations, blindness and brain damage. The charity relies on the generosity and support of the local community to help continue its vital work across Northern Ireland.

For more information about the work of Meningitis Research Foundation and how you can get involved, email karend@meningitis-ni.org or visit www.meningitis.org