Robbie mixes business with community work

Aaron Andrews (left) and Robbie Bryson (right) from R City Media, presenting as Miami House Party, give Jake McCullough a quick tutorial on the decks at the recent DJ workshop held in Whiteabbey Community Centre. INNT 14-415-RM   Pic by Ronnie Moore
Aaron Andrews (left) and Robbie Bryson (right) from R City Media, presenting as Miami House Party, give Jake McCullough a quick tutorial on the decks at the recent DJ workshop held in Whiteabbey Community Centre. INNT 14-415-RM Pic by Ronnie Moore

RATHCOOLE man Robbie Bryson is helping to put the beat back into the local community and motivate young people to make something of their lives.

The 25-year-old DJ, along with his business partner Aaron Andrews, is aiming to take the world by storm.

Robbie describes their music as a “big commercial sound” similar to the likes of the Swedish House Mafia and Calvin Harris, both acts which have sold millions of records and earned critical acclaim. They have also been signed up by record label The Bucks Music Group which also represents top pop act Ed Sheeran.

Robbie and Aaron also produce a radio show which is syndicated across the world gaining them a large fanbase.

It’s a long way from his humble beginnings of watching his brother take to the decks.

“I wanted to be better then him, as all brothers want,” said Robbie. “But I soon realised I had a bit of a talent for it.”

Robbie, at the age of 19 was named best club DJ at the Fate magazine awards. He has toured Europe and has over the years held residencies at several Belfast nightclubs. He and Aaron have also produced and sold numerous compilation albums around the world.

But despite his rapid rise to the top, he is determined to bring his community along with him and leave a lasting legacy.

Robbie has been touring community groups and youth groups, not just in Newtownabbey but across the province, to try and show young people that there is more to life than drink, drugs and getting into trouble.

He told the Times: “I just want to provide an incentive to the kids and show them, that I was just like them not so long ago. I went to the same schools and had similar experiences to them and they really can be what they want to be.

“My DJ workshops help them build a bit of confidence and self-esteem. I hope it shows them that with a bit of hard work anything can be possible.”

Robbie, who attended Monkstown Community School, has in the past week held DJ workshops in Whiteabbey Community Centre and the Dunanney Centre in Rathcoole.

“There has been a good reaction,” continued Robbie. “The kids really get into it and open up to you.

“But what has been very surprising for me is that they are realising the importance of having a goal in life. They are starting to say what they want to do and it’s not all about music, they are saying they want to be nurses or builders.

“They realise the importance of making the right decisions and for me all I want to do is give something back to the community that helped me get where I am today.

“Since my dad took ill I realised that there was a bit more to life than looking out for yourself and I just want to give something back.

“People may think the music business is all sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll and it is not that way at all - the complete opposite in fact. It’s a lot of hard work. Plus me and Aaron don’t drink, but we still know how to have a good time.”