Snow Patrol support Joby Murphy Fund

Snow Patrol's Gary Lightbody at the Odyssey Arena in Belfast on January 23. Glengormley man Joby Murphy was in the concert audience before he later fell to his death in Belfast Harbour. The band have made a donation to the fund set up by his family to raise specialist search equipment. Picture Pacemaker Arthur Allison. INNT 11-603con
Snow Patrol's Gary Lightbody at the Odyssey Arena in Belfast on January 23. Glengormley man Joby Murphy was in the concert audience before he later fell to his death in Belfast Harbour. The band have made a donation to the fund set up by his family to raise specialist search equipment. Picture Pacemaker Arthur Allison. INNT 11-603con

INDIE rock band Snow Patrol have donated £10,000 to the Joby Murphy Fund in memory of the Glengormley man who was a massive fan of the group.

Joby, from Elmfield, fell into the river Lagan and drowned after a night out with friends in January.

Joby Murphy. INNT 05-055-FP

Joby Murphy. INNT 05-055-FP

He had been drinking in one of the nightclubs in the Odyssey complex after attending a Snow Patrol concert in the Arena.

For 30 days search teams combed the harbour sea bed in search of Joby’s missing body before his remains were finally recovered.

Joby’s family, who held a constant vigil in the Lagan Lookout while the searching continued, have been campaigning for better safety measures on the bridge from which Joby fell. And they have started a fund to raise cash for specialist sonar equipment to help with any future search operations.

Joby’s father Joe said he was taken aback when representatives from the band contacted him.

He said: “Joby was a massive Snow Patrol fan and the band have been very generous to the fund.

“It is more than what we ever expected and we are very thankful to them for their help - it was a total surprise.

“The sonar equipment the search team found Joby with was actually bought by another family who lost a son like we did.

“The equipment, which came up from the south, is constantly in demand and there should be one available for use and based in Belfast.”

Meanwhile, a government audit of safety measures has recommended an enhanced CCTV system, telephone hotline and public address system be put in place on the river bridge where Joby fell to his death.

According to Joby’s father however, the measures do not go far enough.

Joe said: “These measures are designed more to try and stop people committing suicide.

“But a lot of the people using the bridge will be out on the drink and can fall in just like my son did.

“A lifebelt or something for those that fall into the water to grab hold of, to me, makes a lot of sense and I can’t understand why that is not being considered.”

Family and friends of Joby have so far raised over £14,000 for the fund that was set up in honour of the 20-year-old.

They hope to raise £50,000 in order to purchase the specialist search equipment.

A number of fundraisers are in the pipleine - including an auction of signed sporting memorabilia from icons such as boxer Ricky Hatton and snooker champion Mark Allen, with lots more to be added.

A charity walk, which starts from the Gasworks on the Antrim Road, will take place on March 24 and a boxing night will be held in St Kevin’s in North Queen Street on March 31. Full details can be found on the Joby Murphy Trust page on Facebook.

Donations to the fund can be made at the Ulster Bank branch, Farmley Road, Glengormley.